Did Missouri’s Vaccine Reward Lottery Work?

Apparently not. No surprises here. There is significant data, from outside the COVID-19 universe, that it is the incentive of hard cash that, if anything, can help motivate the move toward health and wellness seeking behavior. Did anybody in Missouri actually consult anyone else in advance? Who advised that a lottery would draw large numbers of people into the vaccination fold?

Missouri Can’t Compete in a Free Market for Travel Nurses

So, what next? For all those dithering about whether the unvaccinated ought to be eligible for hospital-based COVID-19 treatment, maybe it is time to stop and think about how having a hospital “bed” available means more than a physical bed, it means a staffed bed, and, in particular, a bed staffed for COVID-19 treatment. The brutality of the market is determining who gets a fully staffed COVID-19 hospital bed in Missouri, not the philosopher kings among us.

Aggressive Recruitment of Unvaccinated Health Professionals by Nebraska’s Department of Veteran Affairs

I don’t have a good feeling about this, as reported by Modern Health Care:

Nebraska’s veterans affairs agency is facing questions from a state lawmaker after it published job advertisements for nurses touting the fact that the state doesn’t require its employees to get coronavirus vaccinations.

The ads on a state jobs website prominently note the lack of vaccination requirements for state employees, right after mentioning a $5,000 hiring bonus. In a separate mail advertisement, the state lists “No mandated COVID-19 vaccination” as one of the “many great benefits” of its nursing jobs.

Can a University Prohibit a Teacher From Re-Considering a F2F Teaching Election in Light of Fast Changing COVID-19 Developments in Out of Control Spread Areas?

They can try. From today’s email from UMKC’s administration, a statement that course modality may not be altered without the consent of a Dean:

Changes to Class Format

Changes to course format this close to the start of the semester are highly disruptive to our students.  For that reason, faculty should not be changing class modality at this time. Only under rare and exceptional circumstances, and when it would not be disruptive to students, a chair, with dean support, can change a course modality. 

They can try. But, isn’t the risk assessment for each individual variable and fact dependent?